academic faculty
Fall Term
   Geol 446
Winter Term
   Geol 249
   Geol 349
   Geol 447
   Geol 858
Current Research
Recent Publications
Research Links
40Ar/39Ar Geochronology Lab at Queen's
American Geophysical Union
The Geochemical Society
Geological Association of Canada
Geological Society of America
Mineralogical Society of America
Journal Links
Nature
Science
Earth and Planetary Science Letters
Geology
Chemical Geology
Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta
Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology
Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences


Dr. James K.W.Lee, P.Eng
Office: Bruce Wing 325,
Phone: (613) 533-2601,
Fax (613) 533-6592,
E-mail: lee@geol.queensu.ca


Department of Geological Sciences & Geological Engineering,
Miller Hall, Queen's University,
Kingston, Ontario,
K7L 3N6

Geochronology is all about the radiometric dating of rocks. My research interests involve applying radiogenic isotope geochronology (40Ar/39Ar and U/Pb), mass spectrometry, and principles of mathematics, physics and chemistry to investigate fundamental problems in geology.
As a result, my current research revolves around three main areas of interest:
    (1) measuring diffusion rates for geochronologically important minerals,
    (2) examining mechanisms of transport other than solid-state diffusion, and
    (3) applying principles of diffusion to study geological processes and to unravel the thermal (T-t) histories of a geologic terranes.
These areas of research lend themselves to multidisciplinary studies involving field work, laboratory experiments and theoretical modelling. My secondary interests involve the numerical modelling of diffusion, and the physical characterization of minerals using electron microscopy (scanning electron microscopy, electron microprobe). Consequently, the ultimate goal of my research is to give us a better understanding of the significance of the ages that we measure.

Knowledge of the ages of rocks is critical to many others working in earth science and geological engineering, including mineralogists, structural geologists, planetary scientists, tectonicists, geological consultants, mine geologists, and those in resource-based industries such as mineral exploration and oil & gas. Graduate students will be exposed to a multi-faceted research program, have the opportunity to learn a wide variety of analytical techniques, and acquire a strong foundation in applying geochronological techniques to solving geological problems.

    Education and Experience

  • B.Sc. Eng. 1986, Geological Engineering, Queen's University
  • M.A. 1988, Geological and Geophysical Sciences, Princeton University
  • Ph.D. 1991, Geological and Geophysical Sciences, Princeton University
  • Postdoctoral Fellow, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) - Research School of Earth Sciences, The Australian National University
  • Postdoctoral Fellow, Australian Research Council (ARC) - Research School of Earth Sciences, The Australian National University
  • Research Fellow - Research School of Earth Sciences, The Australian National University

  • - currently Associate Professor

    Professional Associations

    American Geophysical Union
    The Geochemical Society
    Geological Association of Canada
    Geological Society of America
    Mineralogical Society of America
    Sigma Xi
    Association of Professional Engineers of Ontario



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Last Revision: 15 June, 2004